The American College of Lifestyle Medicine provides leadership and assistance, facilitating lifestyle medicine clinicians' pursuits of continuing medical education, practice knowledge, leadership skills, and research information needed to provide quality patient care and best treat patients with lifestyle-related diseases.

19 Oct 2014 (PDT) • San Diego, CA
19 Oct 2014 8:30 AM (PDT) • Hyatt Regency Mission Bay Hotel
21 Oct 2014 7:00 PM (EDT) • Hyatt Regency Mission Bay Hotel


Only Enough is Enough

For any medicine, timing and dose matter. For lifestyle medicine, with our national conference coming up fast, a double dose of high-profile commentaries about the medicine we have versus the medicine we need is a timely opportunity for reorientation.

The initial provocation was delivered by the British Medical Journal in June. A commentary published on the BMJ blog site asserted, in essence, that lifestyle medicine is ineffective. Specifically, it said that screening for chronic disease risk factors in the general population, and addressing them with lifestyle counseling in the clinical setting, is of no value. The commentary was in response to a paper published in the BMJ that reached essentially the same conclusion. An accompanying editorial was entitled: “General health checks don’t work” and began with “it’s time to let them go.”

The trial that provoked these responses randomized a large sample of Danish adults either to screening for chronic disease risk factors with tailored lifestyle counseling, or usual care. After 10 years, the two groups did not differ for the rate of heart disease or all-cause mortality.

For any medicine, timing and dose matter.  For lifestyle medicine, with our national conference coming up fast, a double dose of high-profile commentaries about the medicine we have versus the medicine we need is a timely opportunity for reorientation.

The initial provocation was delivered by the British Medical Journal in June.  A commentary published on the BMJ blog site asserted, in essence, that lifestyle medicine is ineffective.  Specifically, it said that screening for chronic disease risk factors in the general population, and addressing them with lifestyle counseling in the clinical setting, is of no value.  The commentary was in response to a paper published in the BMJ that reached essentially the same conclusion.  An accompanying editorial was entitled: “General health checks don’t work” and began with “it’s time to let them go.”

The trial that provoked these responses randomized a large sample of Danish adults either to screening for chronic disease risk factors with tailored lifestyle counseling, or usual care.  After 10 years, the two groups did not differ for the rate of heart disease or all-cause mortality.


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